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dougal

Unhealthy diets/poor fitness levels

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I always remember a friend of mine telling me from last season that she seen one of our bigger names players at 4am absolutely blazing stumbling out of Maccy D's on a Saturday night, which might not seem so bad until you realise this was the week we had a midweek game away from home....I'll also mention it was last season before the possibly pivotal humping at Accies. Im not one who believes that players are not allowed to let their hair down, and eat and drink and be merry.....but getting into this type of state from personal experience usually requires about 2-3 days before feeling human again. I cannot imagine this player was in top form literally 3 days later for what would become a massive turning point down

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3 hours ago, Laurence said:

How many of our players could run around our ground 50 times.

I suggest the team are booked into the Inverness Harrier club , for some hard training on the nearby Hills. A wee bit of cross country will do them good.

How many of our players would NEED to run round the ground 50 times? I'm afraid Laurence's observation doesn't quite match the training activity with the competitive demands. I remember discussing this with Charlie Christie when he was manager, and finding a lot of agreement. The specific performance requirements of a 90 minute game of football are very far removed from, and far more complex than, very extended, steady paced running as described. Any manager who exposed his players to this kind of activity would find that his team very quickly got into extreme difficulty.

As for Inverness Harriers, apart from our club policy that our coaching resources are targeted exclusively at the needs of our own members so we don't offer a "fitness service" for other sports, the second quoted sentence over-simplifies the activities of an athletics club just as much as the first does with football. I'm also quite sure that ICT management are perfectly well qualified to devise fitness and conditioning regimes which are absolutely specific to football.

Edited by Charles Bannerman
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2 hours ago, CableGuy said:

I always remember a friend of mine telling me from last season that she seen one of our bigger names players at 4am absolutely blazing stumbling out of Maccy D's on a Saturday night, which might not seem so bad until you realise this was the week we had a midweek game away from home....I'll also mention it was last season before the possibly pivotal humping at Accies. Im not one who believes that players are not allowed to let their hair down, and eat and drink and be merry.....but getting into this type of state from personal experience usually requires about 2-3 days before feeling human again. I cannot imagine this player was in top form literally 3 days later for what would become a massive turning point down

I was at that game & we certainly played like they all had the hangover from hell...:lol:

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4 hours ago, Laurence said:

Brian Clough once said  " How do yo make Millionaires sweat " ?   This indicates that footballers really don't care for training

My Dad a Rochdale Harrier, would run 50 times around the Rochdale Hornets Rugby ground.

How many of our players could run around our ground 50 times.

I suggest the team are booked into the Inverness Harrier club , for some hard training on the nearby Hills. A wee bit of cross country will do them good.

FFS, aye, let's send them to the Harriers, the Sneck's own failure factory for the toon's bourgeoisie, a wee jog roond Queen's Park while they ruminate over their Higher Physics homework.

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8 minutes ago, dougiedanger said:

FFS, aye, let's send them to the Harriers, the Sneck's own failure factory for the toon's bourgeoisie, a wee jog roond Queen's Park while they ruminate over their Higher Physics homework.

Sounds like one of these Rough Boys From The High School :ohmy: is getting all chippy about his long distant schooldays again :smile: It's so Freudian!

Edited by Charles Bannerman
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What's wrong with attending the high school? That's quite offensive. Why would you not single one of the other secondary schools in inverness, very poor attitude.

Edited by MorayJaggie
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Don't get too worked up about it MJ. If you aren't from these parts, or of a certain generation, you may not fully appreciate the context and background. 😊

Nor indeed some of the typical retaliations :lol:

 

Edited by Charles Bannerman
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I see High School alumna Ali Smith has just made the short list for the Man Booker prize.

Remind me, what year was it that "The Caddy Rats" trilogy was nominated for the Mun Booker?

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The same year as The Boys From The Ferry and The Battle Of The Ferry were nominated for the Nobel Prize For Literature😊 (This could go on all night righ'eenaff😄 and it has nothing to do with the OP.... which in turn is a fishing expedition anyway.)

Edited by Charles Bannerman
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FFS, Give this a rest, and concentrate how we can establish ourselves as a senior football club again. My first suggestion would be to  have a decent goalkeeper. Sorry Mark, but I don't think you will make it for what we are trying to achieve!

 

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CB is unfortunately dwelling in the days of the Merger and the 11 Plus determinations. But Finmack - are you suggesting that Ridgers is overeating. I would have thought that there would be definite positives in a fat goalie.

Related image

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53 minutes ago, IMMORTAL HOWDEN ENDER said:

But Finmack - are you suggesting that Ridgers is overeating. I would have thought that there would be definite positives in a fat goalie.

Rather see him fit than fat

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On ‎13‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 3:49 PM, Charles Bannerman said:

How many of our players would NEED to run round the ground 50 times? I'm afraid Laurence's observation doesn't quite match the training activity with the competitive demands. I remember discussing this with Charlie Christie when he was manager, and finding a lot of agreement. The specific performance requirements of a 90 minute game of football are very far removed from, and far more complex than, very extended, steady paced running as described. Any manager who exposed his players to this kind of activity would find that his team very quickly got into extreme difficulty.

As for Inverness Harriers, apart from our club policy that our coaching resources are targeted exclusively at the needs of our own members so we don't offer a "fitness service" for other sports, the second quoted sentence over-simplifies the activities of an athletics club just as much as the first does with football. I'm also quite sure that ICT management are perfectly well qualified to devise fitness and conditioning regimes which are absolutely specific to football.

I bow to your much superior knowledge on Fitness training

Again I quote Mr Clough - " Only place running will get you is the 4th Division ".

 

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Messi eater

The hours spent honing set pieces, stamina and skills on the training ground are rendered pointless if you turn up for kick-off lacking energy due to a poor dietary regime. "You should pay as much attention to your nutrition as you do to every other aspect of your game," says sports nutritionist Gavin Allinson. "It's no hardship to do what the elite athletes do." You might not compare favourably to Lionel Messi on the pitch, but matching him meal for meal is a far simpler feat...

Seven days before the game

Carb-loading correctly for match-day is a far more complex process than gorging on pasta with a bit of tuna thrown in the night before: perfectly optimising your body for 90 minutes of football is very much a 24/7 pursuit. Matt Lovell, who works with England international footballers alongside his duties as chief nutritionist for the England rugby team, recommends depleting your carbohydrate stores in the early part of the week and gradually increasing your carbs as match day approaches. Shirking carbs at the start of the week forces your muscles to increase their carb-absorbing GLUT-4 receptors as the body attempts to maximise the limited blood-sugar available. This increased sensitivity is then taken advantage of by piling on the carbs closer to Saturday. "This 'supercompensation' method can increase your maximal amount of stored glycogen by up to 50%," explains Lovell.

Two or three days before the game

Hit the soups. "These will help with your hydration," says Allinson, who particularly recommends tom yum: "It's got lots of chilli, turmeric and ginger, which all help to thin your blood – and thinner blood goes round your body quicker, delivering more oxygen to your cells." What's more, a study in the journal Gut found curcumin, a principle component of turmeric, significantly curbs liver cell damage and scarring. Making those post-match pints slightly more guilt-free.

The day before the game

The evening meal before a game is the most crucial of all. Big match nerves can make the prospect of consuming anything at all on the day nauseating – but provided you eat well the night before and exert very little energy pre-game, turning up primed to perform is still possible. "You want more carbs than usual, but not a bucketload," advises Lovell.

Some fish or chicken along with sweet potato or a jacket potato, alongside some green veg, is a good bet. Have nothing heavy (steak is out). Go Popeye and add spinach, which is packed with vitamins and carotenoid antioxidants. Buy it from a supermarket and, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the exposure to fluorescent light will have significantly boosted its vitamin C content – vital for aiding iron absorption and thus oxygen transport to your muscles.

Six hours to go

Getting a good night's rest is just as important as eating right. So if you've an early kick off, favour kip over kippers. "It's better to have the extra sleep rather than wake up earlier just to eat," says Allinson.

Once out of bed, eat as soon as you can. "Avoid wheat and wheat-based products because they can have the tendency to cause bloating," advises Lovell. You should also steer away from foods high in fibre as these can sit in the stomach and take a long time to digest. Try stirring some protein into goat's milk porridge, or combine an omelette with some fruit salad for a good balance of carbs, protein and fat.

Four hours to go

You may be en-route to the game at this stage, so it's important to have something portable. A personal favourite of Lovell's is quinoa with chicken and some roasted veg. Prep it the night before and pop it in a container. The last thing you want is to be stuck at a service station morosely eyeing the pasties. A jacket potato with some tuna or salmon is another good option. "Trial different meals and find out what works best for you," advises Allinson. Just make sure you focus on starchy carbs and keep fat intake to a minimum.

90 minutes to go

Your final nutritional hit should be delivered 75-90 minutes before kick off. "Tropical fruits – mangos, papaya, pineapples, bananas – are all good at this stage because they've got modest amounts of fibre and don't give as much of a sugar rush as other fruits," says Allinson. Too much of the sweet stuff can lead to lethargy due to blood sugar fluctuations, so avoid sports drinks until immediately before the game, too.

If nerves get the better of you, a liquid meal may be best. Lovell recommends blending 25g of oats with 500ml of skimmed goats milk, one or two scoops of protein powder, half a banana, a few nuts and a teaspoon of honey. Not as tasty as pint of the black stuff, for sure. But undoubtedly more effective.

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22 hours ago, IMMORTAL HOWDEN ENDER said:

CB is unfortunately dwelling in the days of the Merger and the 11 Plus determinations. But Finmack - are you suggesting that Ridgers is overeating. I would have thought that there would be definite positives in a fat goalie.

Related image:ictscarf:

One of our coaches has a new haircut! :ictscarf:

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There are quite a few very good bits of advice in IHE's last post but one, but I am more than a bit doubtful about trying to utilise Glycogen Overshoot (as quoted in "seven days before the game") in football. This is used by some marathon and marathon+ runners (only some) and the theory is that, if you cut right back on carbohydrates several days before a race and then stuff yourself with them immediately before, you can fool your liver into taking on board a greater load of carbohydrate than it would do under normal circumstances. However, in the case of football, I would have a number of serious doubts about how much use this would be.

For a start, the total energy demands of a game of football are very much less than a long distance running race involving 2 hours+ of constant activity - and also very different. Consequently, depletion of liver glycogen stocks is much less likely, especially when, after 45 minutes, you have plenty of time to restock with carbohydrate, and in a manner which is far better suited to football where there are intense bursts of anaerobic activity not found in a long distance running race. Secondly, what is known in long distance running as "the diet" can be VERY hit and miss. Get it right and - IF it is relevant - it may well produce dividends. But get the timing wrong and you may find yourself going into competition with a severely depleted liver and hence fatally out of fuel, with disastrous consequences. Thirdly, this is all very well if you are preparing for marathons and are hence only competing at that distance three or four times a year. Across a 45 game football season, it simply isn't realistic to try to do this on any meaningful number of occasions.

This looks to me like an attempt to apply a procedure to a situation to which it is not relevant.

Edited by Charles Bannerman

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ffs, 69 replies. Help me lord.

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4 minutes ago, tm4tj said:

ffs, 69 replies. Help me lord.

Yes Manfer, I know this is pretty extreme in response to one of Dougal's fishing expeditions but there is maybe also the collateral benefit of the message that football is moving on in terms of the kind of demands that need to be made of players in the modern era.

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15 minutes ago, tm4tj said:

ffs, 69 replies. Help me lord.

69 before the game should do you well :wink:

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3 hours ago, IBM said:

69 before the game should do you well :wink:

69 at any time sounds good to me :wink:

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