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Yep! Dead as a Dodo, like. Bughtie.

In fact I would suggest that this thread must be a dead-ringer for more comments wouldn't you?

But , truly, in point of fact this thread is, well, probably pretty penny d.r.eadful.:laugh:

 

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That one certainly needed a second look! My best estimate is that this is again taken from the top of Tomnahurich, looking North Easterly over the RNI (centre photo), then left to right about two thirds of the way up is Culduthel Road, starting towards the left hand side with the strange building with the tower which was the Kerr family home on the corner of Culduthel and Old Edinburgh Roads. This looks like a pretty old photo since much of Ballifeary Rd isn't there yet, nor are the council houses on the cemetery side of Glenurquhart Road. I'm guessing that the T-junction bottom right may be of Glenurquhart Road and a somewhat embryonic Ballifeary Lane.

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The Fiddlers of Tomnahurich
Two travelling fiddlers were visiting Inverness looking for places where they could play, while searching for a suitable venue they met an old man in strange clothes, who asked them if they would perform for him. They agreed and followed the old man to the wooden hill of Tomnahurich, just as the sun slipped out of view over the Western horizon. There was an opening in the side of the hill through which they followed the old man into a brightly lit cavern hall, where a great feast was underway. The feast was attended by a host of people, all dressed in colourful finery, and each seeming to have an air of enchantment and beauty about them. They sat down at one of the many tables and preceded to enjoy the fine wine and the rich food served before them.

Tomnahurich HillTomnahurich Hill

When it came the time for dancing they played their fiddles and the party got into full swing, each fiddler playing better than they had ever played before. Finally, in what seemed like no time at all, the feast was over and it was time for the fiddlers to leave. Their noble company thanked them, and the old man who had led them into the hillside paid them with a bag of silver and gold coins. The fiddlers left the hill in a fine mood, and walked back towards the centre of Inverness. As they neared the town they saw that everything had changed, where there was once dense woodland buildings now stood, as if they had appeared overnight. All the people they met along the way were dressed in strange looking clothes, and poked fun at the fiddlers 'old fashioned' clothing.

The fiddlers decided that they had been enchanted in some strange way and made the return journey to their town. When they arrived they were dismayed to find that everything they knew here had also changed; their homes were no longer occupied and they recognised no one. In despair they ran into the local church where the local priest was in the midst of delivering a sermon. As soon as the priest spoke the word of God both fiddlers crumbled to dust in front of the eyes of the horrified congregation.

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 large burial ground on Glenurquhart Road in Inverness, Tomnahurich Cemetery is located a mile (1.5 km) southwest of the town centre. The cemetery was first laid out on the summit and slopes of the prominent Tomnahurich Hill in 1863 and later expanded to fill the surrounding land. In the 20th century the town grew and prevented further expansion of the cemetery, which is constrained to the west by the Caledonian Canal. Legend suggests that the 13th-century seer Thomas the Rhymer is buried here. Notable burials include local architect Alexander Ross (1834 - 1925) and the remains of two holders of the Victoria Cross; namely Major-General Sir Robert Adams (1856 - 1928) who won the medal during the Indian Mutiny, and submariner Rear Admiral Sir Anthony Capel Miers (1908-85).

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A rare example of a pretty poor illustration on here. Apart from the painting's sort of general Lowry-like depiction, the Castle looks nothing like itself and St Columba High Church is missing altogether. The date is post-1864 since the Northern Meeting Park is there. St Columba church dates from 1852 so should be there but isn't. You can see the main Steeple (which perhaps looks a bit too far away from the Castle) and then it seems a great distance along the river to the Free North (post 1843) and the Old High (very old). But there is a steeple missing in between the main Steeple and the Free North. I'm not sure if that's meant to be the old Royal Academy centre right, in which case the date would be post-1895.

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