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dougiedanger

Nunneries of Sneck

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Does anyone know how common it was for young women in the Highlands to convert to Catholicism and became a nun in the early to mid twentieth century or at any other time?

I know of one such case, but not of how it happened or why. 

Very niche question, I know.ūüôŹ

 

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Would be really hard to workout since in the past Scotland was a very big Catholic population after Saint Columbus came. Only group who may be able to help would be a Catholic church in Scotland or possibly contacting someone who is high up in the Catholic Church management.

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7 hours ago, IMMORTAL HOWDEN ENDER said:

Here is a picture of the Highland Nun Rugby Squad circa 1933

See the source image

Is that Charlie Bannerman in the second row?

...and which one's the hooker?

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On ‚Äé5‚Äé/‚Äé19‚Äé/‚Äé2018 at 12:42 AM, dougiedanger said:

Does anyone know how common it was for young women in the Highlands to convert to Catholicism and became a nun in the early to mid twentieth century or at any other time?

I know of one such case, but not of how it happened or why. 

Very niche question, I know.ūüôŹ

 

There was  certainly a convent - La Sagesse - in Inverness until a few decades ago. I think it was in what is now the accountants' office on the corner of Southside Road. Next door used to be Hill Park Roman Catholic girls' hostel, until it burned down dramatically in 1959. What's now St Ninian's Catholic Church was then built on that site. There does rtherefore seem to have been a presence of nuns in Inverness for quite some time, although I don't know how many were local.

The Highlands does have the odd fairly strong Catholic enclave. I believe Beauly is one such example, possibly due to the influence of the Chiefs of the Clan Fraser who seem to have retained their Catholicism. I'm not sure if the Fort William area is another stronghold but there are Catholic churches all over the area.

There would therefore appear to be the means and possibly one motivation in the period in question might have been the loss of a boyfriend in WWI? On the other hand, the scenario I've described isn't maybe all that different from more or less anywhere.

Blair makes reference to St Columba who certainly made his presence felt in the North of Scotland in the 6th century, but in the South West of Scotland, St Ninian is believed to have spread Christianity as early as the late 4th/early 5th centuries. Of course, until the Reformation in the 16th century, everyone was a Catholic and the consequences of that split still rumble on. I could therefore guess that, in the staunchly Presbyterian parts of the Highlands, conversion to Catholicism, never mind becoming a nun, would not have been without its controversy!

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20 hours ago, CaleyD said:

Is that Charlie Bannerman in the second row?

...and which one's the hooker?

The Hills Are Alive.......and which one nicked the distributor cap?

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1 hour ago, Charles Bannerman said:

There was  certainly a convent - La Sagesse - in Inverness until a few decades ago. I think it was in what is now the accountants' office on the corner of Southside Road. Next door used to be Hill Park Roman Catholic girls' hostel, until it burned down dramatically in 1959. What's now St Ninian's Catholic Church was then built on that site. There does rtherefore seem to have been a presence of nuns in Inverness for quite some time, although I don't know how many were local.

The Highlands does have the odd fairly strong Catholic enclave. I believe Beauly is one such example, possibly due to the influence of the Chiefs of the Clan Fraser who seem to have retained their Catholicism. I'm not sure if the Fort William area is another stronghold but there are Catholic churches all over the area.

There would therefore appear to be the means and possibly one motivation in the period in question might have been the loss of a boyfriend in WWI? On the other hand, the scenario I've described isn't maybe all that different from more or less anywhere.

Blair makes reference to St Columba who certainly made his presence felt in the North of Scotland in the 6th century, but in the South West of Scotland, St Ninian is believed to have spread Christianity as early as the late 4th/early 5th centuries. Of course, until the Reformation in the 16th century, everyone was a Catholic and the consequences of that split still rumble on. I could therefore guess that, in the staunchly Presbyterian parts of the Highlands, conversion to Catholicism, never mind becoming a nun, would not have been without its controversy!

Thanks for this, didn't know about the convent. Yes, Beauly and Kiltarlity have high proportions of 'indigenous' Catholics, and I think it must be down to the clan chief's choices.

There used to be nuns that ran a playgroup, Ballifeary way I think.

I think the war may well have been a motivation in the case in question: two brothers died. Also, the person was academically gifted, though from a poor family, so career options may have been very limited.

I think it was very controversial!

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41 minutes ago, dougiedanger said:

Thanks for this, didn't know about the convent. 

In the late 60s and possibly early 70s, I used to go there for piano lessons - as did quite a few of my contemporaries. The nuns were all very friendly and happy people. La Sagesse (the Wisdom) is, I believe, a teaching order.

One of my strongest memories of the place is that there was frequently the most glorious smell of bread or other baking permeating through the building. Someone really knew the art of temptation!

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12 minutes ago, snorbens_caleyman said:

In the late 60s and possibly early 70s, I used to go there for piano lessons - as did quite a few of my contemporaries. The nuns were all very friendly and happy people. La Sagesse (the Wisdom) is, I believe, a teaching order.

One of my strongest memories of the place is that there was frequently the most glorious smell of bread or other baking permeating through the building. Someone really knew the art of temptation!

Thanks, I guess there were plenty hot cross buns on the go!

The person I am thinking of also went on mission work to Africa, and I think spent a great part of her life there.

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4 minutes ago, dougiedanger said:

Thanks, I guess there were plenty hot cross buns on the go!

 

Buns in the oven in a convent!  Surely not!

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35 minutes ago, dougiedanger said:

The person I am thinking of also went on mission work to Africa, and I think spent a great part of her life there.

She obviously retained her missionary position for a long time, then!

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18 hours ago, snorbens_caleyman said:

In the late 60s and possibly early 70s, I used to go there for piano lessons - as did quite a few of my contemporaries. The nuns were all very friendly and happy people. La Sagesse (the Wisdom) is, I believe, a teaching order.

One of my strongest memories of the place is that there was frequently the most glorious smell of bread or other baking permeating through the building. Someone really knew the art of temptation!

The convent at the corner of Southside Road/Culduthel road was indeed a primary school from soon after WW11 right through to the mid/late1950s..  It had two classrooms run by Sister Agnes, for the younger kids, and Sister Mary Frances for the older ones.

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On ‚Äé5‚Äé/‚Äé20‚Äé/‚Äé2018 at 12:27 PM, Blair said:

Would be really hard to workout since in the past Scotland was a very big Catholic population after Saint Columbus came. Only group who may be able to help would be a Catholic church in Scotland or possibly contacting someone who is high up in the Catholic Church management.

Probably a bit busy fielding allegations of physical and sexual abuse by nuns and priests in the 60s and 70s.

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