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IMMORTAL HOWDEN ENDER

Anyone Recognise ?

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Used to be on Tomnahurich Street, IIRC.  I always meant to take a photo, but never had a camera with me.

There used to be a Chinese takeaway in Falkirk - where my wife comes from - called "The Family Way".

And somewhere I have a photo of a sports shoe shop in Nicosia, called "Athlete's Foot".

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On 3/8/2017 at 4:02 PM, snorbens_caleyman said:

Used to be on Tomnahurich Street, IIRC.  I always meant to take a photo, but never had a camera with me.

 

They are still trading now at Harbour Road in the old Frasers Auction Mart.

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2 hours ago, IBM said:

They are still trading now at Harbour Road in the old Frasers Auction Mart.

We bought a wood burning stove from Bonk and manage to to achieve a lovely warm glow reclining on the shag pile carpet in front of it.

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1 hour ago, DoofersDad said:

We bought a wood burning stove from Bonk and manage to to achieve a lovely warm glow reclining on the shag pile carpet in front of it.

Was that "triple double entendre" deliberate? :lol:

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On 21/01/2015 at 6:49 PM, Charles Bannerman said:

Skinners was something of a Royal Academy institution and for decades was very popular for its bakeries, pies etc. At one time I think kids were allowed to sprint down Stephen's Brae to get a mid morning snack at interval. The photo looks as if it might be 1920s and I wonder if the Stephen's Brae sign is the same, now rather battered one that sits above what is now Girvans?

The Skinner family, who also had a baker's in Kenneth St (I think?) were big players in the 5th BBs. Of my generation, but a little older were Mike Skinner and Ian Skinner who I think must have become a geography teacher because I remember him as a student teacher at the Academy in about 1966.

Charles - I was at a family meal on Sunday as my brother, Mike, was up from London and we were talking about the shop when my Uncle Tom had it. He mentioned that he'd seen me posting something about the shops and I had no idea what he was on about but luckily he remembered the website had something to do with Caley Football Club and that rang a bell!  All 4 of us were at the Academy - I can remember you being there when I was so I think Ian & Mike would have passed through its portals by then but you were right - Ian went on to become a geography teacher and had a successful career at Lochaber High School for many years. He has now retired and still lives in Lochaber. 

We did have another shop in Kenneth St (No.79) on the corner of Attadale Road but the Stephens' Brae one was the main one and very popular with the Academy pupils as you so correctly pointed out. I personally haven't found any better cakes than Dad used to make and I loved working in the bakehouse with him but then I suppose I'm slightly biased!!  He took the BBs in the East Church and the Young Brothers and also ran the badminton club - in a different life he would have loved to have been a minister and often did lay preaching, standing in for Donald McFarlane, the minister of the East Church. He also took services in the old Barn church out at Culloden - the original one. 

Sadly Dad died prematurely in 1976 of a heart attack. Mum carried on the business for several years afterwards but eventually sold it to a hairdressers initially then to Girvans. My apologies if I've already posted this - I haven't read the whole thread - but I seem to remember my posts were back in 2012/13 (which is why I couldn't remember them when Mike mentioned it!) and as your post here is 2015 I probably haven't.  Mike had inadvertently come across the postings when doing some research of his own on the shops at the time our great-uncle had them.  That old photo of the Stephen Brae one we think was around 1920ish - Dad's uncle, Tom, had it then - Dad came up to Inverness to work for him then eventually took over the shops when Uncle Tom became too infirm to do so. Tom's daughter, Ray, ran a cafe near the Old High Church end of Church Street - can't remember what it was called but think it started with an S? Strath something maybe?

Now I'm away to search for a post Mike found from someone who said they thought they were related to Tom and Ray which we found really interesting. We think that may be from Tom's wife side of the family whom we know nothing about so I hope I can find out more. 

Hope you are well - loved your books on the Academy - brought back many great memories!

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Well I may not have found the Newspaper article I was looking for when I first came upon this site but I have found one with my father in it. This is him on the right and possibly his brother Victor beside him. He is 85 now and in a retirement home...I am going to see if I can have my niece...who lives close to where they are...if she can get him to confirm Victor and possibly who was playing and who won. His memory is not too good these days. Have added their wedding photo.

Much thanks to 'The Immortal One' for posting this.

Regards,

~E~

Telford Street.jpg

Wedding.jpg

Edited by Eirene

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I think that might be George Street early 60's.  The cars left to right Austin Healy Sprite (frog eyed sprite), Morris Minor, Morris 8 (I think) registered 1948, Standard Vanguard estate, Mini Traveller/Countryman and the front of a Standard Vanguard.

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I lived at the top of George Street until 1961, and that doesn't look like it to me. It was a clear road - wasn't obstructed by a gasholder.

Have a look at this photo.

canmore_image_SC01256508.jpg.699244b259bb89878729c8a724f7966d.jpg

Rose Street runs diagonally from 8 o'clock towards the top right, and if you carry on through School Lane and the one beside the Old High, you eventually reach the Greig Street bridge in the top right quadrant.

So running laterally across the photo, from bottom up, we have the railway, Innes Street (the white street), and then George Street.  As you can see, it is quite clear.

Looking at the relative positions of the chimney and gasholder in the original photo, it must have been taken between the river and the gasworks.  It looks to me as though there may have been a lane running between Chapel Sreet and the gasworks - just to the left of of the graveyard in the photo, but I have no memory of it. Yet I think that's where the original photo must have been taken from.

 

 

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You are right Snorbens, that would have made it Manse Place which no longer exists.

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Railway Terrace from the 60's looking towards the humped back bridge and the house at the top of Innes Street that had the parrots.

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Railway Terrace, leading to the old humpback bridge across the railway. 

I lived in a flat off to the left of the photo, at the corner of Rose Street and George Street. Our living room was what estate agents would describe as "double aspect", with windows onto both streets - and an excellent view of the bridge over the railway.

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Brick-built houses. Well you will rarely see that in Western Canada. Virtually all houses , except  those that  belong to the wealthy and are situated on the hill overlooking the Pacific ocean Inlet, or like situation, are built of wood. The sides of the homes are just wooden frames  built with press board (basically sawdust) and then covered  with left to right strips of siding , one built on top of the other sloping downwards at a slight angle to promote water flow downwards. And wooden roofing covered in  blue tar-like paper then covered in (mostly black) plastic tiles. with sand sprayed onto to them.. Looks good when finished but a puff of wind will blow these  homes over . Ours included.

We are currently expecting the "Big one" (earthquake) any day now and one 5.8  has been recorded yesterday off the coast of Oregon only a few hundred miles south of Vancouver,. The Pacific plate is subducting under the plate on which the Western coast is sitting and we know that Vancouver island is  compressing itself by moving due East because surveyors have placed poles in the ground and later measured the  Eastward movement from the sea inwards. We are sitting within the earthquake zone so our house and every other one  in sight is a gonner if the quake exceed 5 or 6. We are being encouraged to prepare an earthquake kit with blankets, food, etc. etc enough to cope for at least 3 days on the run but the sad truth is that most of us have no preparation done at all. We have talked about it but no real action. Our houses are, for the most part, insured  but the losses on every front will be massive. Are we scared? Yes but a sense of helplessness  akin to stupidity seems to be very prevalent and we rarely talk about it amongst ourselves. When you view what happened in Japan not so log ago (cars sitting 30 feet up on the roofs of buildings) you get the picture. That's from the accompanying Tsunami, dearies, not to mention the  shaking.

Oh well, life goes on I suppose. If it is not one thing it is the other. Currently British Columbia is ablaze --some 580 fires raging throughout the Province. Something like 7000 fire fighters from all over  doing their  best together with water bombers flying all day but no rain for months has made the Province a tinder box and the sight is awesome. The smoke from these fires has now percolated down to our area, way South of the main fire- lines,  and right now we can't see the sky or the backdrop of Mountains around the city  for smoke. Warnings are being issued not to inhale or suffer the consequences  long term !. etc. It's truly a bad deal. Worst fire season  on record, apparently. Global warming is here with a vengeance, whether you believe in it or not.

Antarctica is melting and the huge ice shelves are breaking up  So are the icebergs off the northern coast of Canada coming south down the East coast past Newfoundland. Scientists are  diving under the ice to take measurements of the deterioration to see how long it takes to fully break up and their reports are not amusing at all.

Have a great day tomorrow and I mean that because our future in Western North America is uncertain. But still a very beautiful place  for a short holiday  if you can afford it. :whistle:

 

 

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